Peljesac

One day to explore Dubrovnik is more than enough, at least for us. So today we plan to continue our journey across the various islands. Before we leave we need to re-stock a few things and therefore make a stop in a close by supermarket. It is raining a little bit as we get in but there is torrential rain fall as we are getting out again. Michael runs to the car to bring it closer to the entrance. Still, Karin is soaking wet even from those few meters. Time to switch on the heating.

 

With a full fridge and other goodies we make our way north again. As it keeps raining we decide to make a stop at Mali Ston. One thing Karin wants to do since we came down here the very first time a couple of years back is to walk across the stone wall that connects Mali Ston and its bigger brother Ston. We take a look at the weather forecast and indeed the afternoon is supposed to be a bit better. As we are hungry already and this place is famous for the fresh oysters that they grow here we stop at one of the restaurants. Fresh oysters as a started followed by fresh local fish for lunch. What else can you ask for.

 

Unfortunately the rain has not stopped as we get out again. We decide that it makes no sense to walk across the stone wall in this weather. Not that we don't have the right equipment but what's the point? A large Korean group has a different view and make their way up to the stone wall. But hey, for them it's a bit of longer journey to come here. For us it's just a few hours drive. ;-)

The half island of Peljesac is very famous for the wine that grows here. With this kind of weather it might not be a bad idea to visit a local winery and do some wine tasting. The other day in Dubrovnik we discovered this fantastic Dingac from Matusko. As it happens they are located on Peljesac. That's a plan and so we drive on for a bit further.

 

The place itself does not look that fancy compared to other modern wineries we have visited on other countries. However, as we walk down the stairs into the cellar we get a different impression. They are quite big with different areas for tasting of various group sizes. As it is still off season there is almost nobody else around. Only a group of Americans are about to leave as we arrive.

 

The actual tasting is for free and we get to taste various wines. In the end we find that the one we had the other day  in Dubrovnik is still our favorite. Maybe it is because we are German and the wife of the owner is German as well or the lady serving is just likes us. In any case she also offers us a taste of their premium and highly decorated wine. While we are greateful about this opportunity the wine is not exactly to our taste. So we end up buying a few bottles of the one we really like.

 

As part of the tasting we also learn that on the other side of the hill from where we are now this is actually the region where the grapes are growing for the Dingac. A small tunnel is connecting the two sides. As the sun has come out again we decide to drive to the other side to have a look around. The scenery is beautiful and so we drive further down to the small village of Dingac Borak. This is even more beautiful as there is a little square directly at the sea. As the village is almost empty we decide to just stay here for the night. We open a nice bottle of Dingac that we just bought and with a bit of cheese and ham enjoy the beautiful sunset. Rain in the morning, oysters for lunch and a good bottle of Dingac for dinner. Not that bad after all.

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